2017 Business Summit Agenda

Agenda - Subject to Change

2017 US - Arab Business Summit
Monday, September 25, 2017
The Union League Club, 38 East 37th Street, New York, NY


Speakers

    • COMING SOON

      Speaker Title

      COMPANY NAME

The Union League Club 38 East 37th Street New York, NY
7:00AM - 8:00AM
Main Lounge (1st Floor)

The Importance of Selecting and Managing Your Local Partners in the Middle East
8:00AM - 9:00AM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

The best way to approach a partnership is to look for commercial synergy between the two organizations and intellectual synergy between the people from both parties. How does your business compliment the local partner company and what difference will it make to the local partner to be aligned with your firm? What are the incentives for the local partner to help and support you and are these incentives considered a big enough deal to doing business together

9:00AM - 10:00AM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

10:10AM - 11:10AM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

There are significant differences in how American and Middle Eastern negotiators used strategy and build relationships based on mutual trust before moving to the details of the negotiation. A better understanding of how cultural values, traditions and social mores will dictate success or failure for new business development in the region.

11:20AM - 12:20PM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

In light of the significance of “working women” in both the Arab world and the United States, the purpose of this keynote panel is to describe and to examine the role of their impact in shaping US-Arab perceptions and business relations. The panel discussion will explore similarities and differences in the role and effects of their contributions under seemingly very diverse circumstances. The working theory holds that women the world over share many common characteristics. Among them are the necessities to deal with ownership, to adapt to rapidly changing technology and methods, to contend with the proliferation of means, to operate in diverse environments, and to deal with various challenges to provide credible and reliable SME’s. A major problem is the issue of bias. The important question is not whether bias exists, but to what degree? And, with what perceived effects? Additionally, with what practical implications? What barriers exist for women business owners conducting business in the Middle East? As the number of women entrepreneurs throughout the region continues to grow, what are the educational and training requirements necessary to participate in the most promising business opportunities emerging in the region for women. Comparative perspectives from this panel of media experts will attempt to answer these and related questions

Investing in the Future of Bi-lateral Relations
12:20PM - 1:30PM
Main Dining Third Floor

The Population Reference Bureau recently reported that almost half of the 10 million women who give birth each year in the Middle East and North Africa have some kind of complication, with more than 1 million women suffer serious injuries that lead to long-term illness. These problems harm not just women but also children and families, affecting the quality of life in the region and impeding long-term economic and social development.

1:30PM - 2:30PM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

The Gulf is home to some of the region’s largest corporations, with a majority of the countries citizens under the age of 25. Together with extremely high internet penetration (58% in Jan 2015), smartphone usage, and a globally connected mentality, the region has quickly moved to the top of social media ratings. Statistics reveal that in contribute more than 90 million YouTube views every day.

1:30PM - 2:30PM
Main Lounge (1st Floor)

The Middle East presents investors with significant growth opportunities across the defense, chemical, automotive, energy and maritime sectors throughout the next decade. Regional consumer spending is on the rise, the regional unemployment rate will be below that of France, Germany and Italy for the next three years and compound annual growth rates are forecast to be above average through 2035.

What lies ahead for the Middle East and the US
2:40PM - 3:40PM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

Solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy and hydropower are the main sources of sustainable energy production. What type of renewable is most suitable for each region? Which solution will drive energy policies and investment opportunities across the region. Which will result in Public Private Partnerships and joint ventures? Which will be the next wave of newly formed energy companies that will partner with veteran international companies? Which ones will provide the training and know-how transfers in these partnerships/ joint venture agreements.

2:40PM - 3:40PM
Main Lounge (1st Floor)

There has been a steady rise There has been a steady rise in annual patent filing numbers in the GCC countries since the late 1990s, from 57 in 1998 to 2,198 in 2013 – illustrating the fact that companies increasingly see the value of protecting IP in the Arab region. Of the 23,000 applications filed between 1998 and 2013, only 5% were filed by residents but that balance may well be starting to shift. There are two main routes for the protection of tools, processes and inventions via patent in the Arab world. The first involves filing a single GCC application, usually within 12 months, and the second is to pursue the national filing route after 30 months via the international PCT. A single Gulf Cooperation Council (covering Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman and UAE) application filed in parallel to an international PCT application is the most cost-effective but pursuing a national filing route at each of the national patent offices following the international PCT route offers a second chance but is more expensive. Wider IP protections can also be achieved throughout the region, especially in relation to brands. Industrial designs can mostly be protected in the region but the weakest safeguards exist in relation to software and copyright law in Qatar, Iraq and Iran. The region's technology needs are evolving fast and the question companies in the market, or those wishing to enter it, need to ask themselves is whether their IP strategy is fit for purpose. Besides applying for patent and industrial design protection, the panel will also discuss IP issues to consider when negotiating employment and other agreements in the GCC and MENA region, and in connection with importing or exporting products from and to this part of the world. Others are ramping up Arab IP protection – should you? Moderator, TBD Speaker TBD Speaker TBD Speaker TBD Speaker TBD Speaker TBD

3:50PM - 4:50PM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

There have been significant improvements in formal education in the Middle East during the past few decades, yet the gap between education and employment is still widening. Governments across the MENA region have invested heavily in education, and the past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of primary, secondary and tertiary education. Panel discussion will cover how government and educational institutions are addressing changes needed in education to combat widespread unemployment

The Major Trends Driving Defense Budgets in the Region
3:50PM - 4:50PM
Main Lounge (1st Floor)

Nearly $100 billion in defense sales are estimated in the Middle East and North Africa through 2019, along with tens of billions of dollars in services and support contracts, according to new estimates by a leading defense industry experts. The region's largest spenders are Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Iraq and Algeria. This panel will explore and discuss trend lines in defense spending over the coming years.

Maritime Security: Protecting The Economic Waterways of the Middle East
5:00PM - 5:30PM
Lincoln Hall (2nd Floor)

The waterways of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA region) are among the most important in the world. They facilitate the export of large volumes of oil and natural gas from the region, while also bridging traders in the Eastern and Western worlds through the Red Sea and Suez Canal. Key discussion topics will address threats to maritime security in the MENA region and what actions have been taken by stakeholders to promote security and close the gap between threats and capabilities