2014 Business Summit Agenda

subject to change

2014 US - Arab Business Summit
A U.S. - Arab Global Event
Monday, October 06, 2014
The Union League Club, 38 East 37th Street, New York, NY


The Importance of Bridging the Gap Between Arab and Western Cultures: The Way Forward - Moderator: Dr. John Duke Anthony, Founding President & CEO, National Council on US-Arab Relations
8:00AM - 9:00AM
Lincoln Hall

Arab-Western relations are deadlocked in a sphere of distrust. The many initiatives by each government, individuals and NGOs have time and again hit the granite wall of suspicion founded on prejudices and misinformation. Exactly the reason why finding 'the way forward' is so difficult a challenge. Therefore, thinking about new policies and activities will require, first and foremost, that each side think about new ways to break the deadlock. In spite of changing conditions and the attendant concerns that accompany such change, whether real or virtual, one side is struggling with contradictions between traditions perceived as typically 'Arabic' against a Western influx of political, social and economical conceptions while the other side often deals with this mutual antagonism using the carrot and stick mentality, in which promises of cooperation are made based on ultimatums or conditional solutions. Ultimately, "bridging the gap" will require each side to engage with one another on the basis of equality and reciprocity. Most likely we will always define one another as 'different'. For that reason alone, 'the way forward' will come about through a mutual dialogue of trust, respect and cooperation. Dr. John Duke Anthony, Ph.D., (Moderator), President and CEO, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations H.E. Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, Former Permanent Representative of Qatar to UN; Former Ambassador to Jordan; President of the Sixty-Sixth UN Genereal Assembly Richard Hobson, Vice President, Olayan America, Olayan Group Susan Peters, Executive Director & COO, Arab Bankers Association of North America (ABANA) Randa Hudome, President, Fahmy Hudome International Mohamed Malouche, Chairman, Tunisian American Young Professionals Randa El-Sayed, Haffar, American University of Beirut Trustee; Director Citi Private Bank; Director, Elmer and Mamdouha Bobst Foundation

Righting the Wrongs (Democracy and Human Rights)
9:00AM - 10:00AM
Lincoln Hall

With some corners of society painting a generic view of the Middle East as a troubled, war-torn region run by autocratic leaders, he urges not to paint the entire Middle East with the same brush. He calls on the West to embrace the success of the Gulf countries and not be swayed by the media perception or risk creating a bigger divide between our communities. He raises Human Rights and Democracy issues in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A self-made man who has built his conglomerate from scratch to become one of the largest family businesses in the region, he shares some success stories from the UAE thanks to the vision of its founders, the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, and the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum - and the foresight of the current rulers. As the unofficial ambassador of the UAE, Mr. Al Habtoor highlights the rising economic clout of his country and the wider region. As a staunch supporter of the Middle East peace process, Mr. Al Habtoor raises the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and offers a different approach for a realistic solution to help move the process forward.

Danny Sebright, President, U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council
10:10AM - 11:10AM
Lincoln Hall

The United States' relationships with countries in the Arab region have historically hinged on security agreements and political partnership, resting on these two pillars to counter perceived threats to common interests such as energy production and shipping lanes. Over the last decade, a third pillar has rapidly emerged to dominate the relationships the US shares with its allies in the Arab world: trade. In fact, the US maintains some of its fastest growing trade relationships with countries in the Arab world. Total bilateral trade between the US and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) rose from an estimated $4.5 billion in 2002 to a record $26.9 billion in 2013, making it the largest export destination in the entire Arab region for US goods for the fifth straight year. As the UAE and other countries in the Gulf move aggressively to attract foreign direct investment and diversify their economies away from a reliance on oil and gas, this relationship is expected to grow exponentially across a diverse array of sectors, including: Aerospace, Defense, Security; Civil and Commercial Aviation; Construction, Infrastructure Development & Green Build; Energy Development (Renewable, Nuclear, Oil & Gas); Media, Tourism and Culture; Healthcare and Medicine; and Education. This panel will explore the ways that trade, commerce, and private sector partnership and investment have propelled the US and its key Arab partners to unprecedented levels of partnership and interoperability. The conversation will delve into a commercial relationship that extends well beyond business ties into the broader realm of security and geo-political issues that face shared interests in the Gulf and broader MENA region. Danny E. Sebright, (Moderator), President, U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council Patrick N. Theros, Former U.S. Ambassador, Qatar, President and Executive Director, US-Qatar Business Council Ambassador Mohammed Al Hussaini Al Sharif, Chief Representative to the United States, League of Arab States Richard Wilson, President, Saudi-US Trade Group, (SUSTG) Jean R. AbiNader, Executive Director, Moroccan American Trade & Investment Center, (MATIC) Fareed Osman, Chairman, Antigravity Group Dr. Mussaad Al-Razouki, CEO, Kleos Healthcare Corporation, Kuwait

Water, Advocacy & Cultural Ethnicities - Moderator: Todd Schwartz, Deputy Special Representative, Commercial & Business Affairs, U.S. Department of State
10:10AM - 11:10AM
Main Lounge

Understanding the Underlying Issues Regarding Regional Relationships: Water, Advocacy & Cultural Ethnicities - Moderator: Todd Schwartz, Deputy Special Representative, Commercial & Business Affairs, U.S. Department of State Rapid changes in the Arab region, especially over the past three years, highlight businesses' need for predictive awareness and the ability to manage the complexities arising from political shifts, economic crises, and rapid social changes. These changes present both opportunities and challenges to businesses looking to establish a foothold in the region. Governmental business promotion and advocacy efforts help businesses make sense of these challenges and take advantage of potential opportunities. In addition to the well-known opportunities and challenges in energy, access to "safe" water has emerged as a growing source of problems. Roughly two-thirds of the Arab world depend on sources outside their borders for their water supply. Egypt, Iran, and Turkey are the only countries in the region with abundant fresh water resources. Disputes over rights to water are a fundamental part of the political relationships in the region. Water for irrigation is necessary for many of the ecosystems to sustain crops. As a result, the scarcity of water is a major cause of concern between states in the Arab region. Former U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali has said that the next war in the Arab region will be fought over water. Other business challenges stem from social and cultural divisions. Over the years, diplomatic advocacy has become increasingly important to resolve domestic conflicts in political, economic, and cultural discrimination. Understanding the impact of these critical opportunities and challenges, and the role of diplomatic advocacy, will help explain how to navigate the commercial landscape when conducting business in the Arab region. Todd Schwartz, (Moderator), Deputy Special Representative, Commercial & Business Affairs, U.S. Department of State Paul Sutphin, Director, Middle East Partnership Initiative, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, U.S. Department of State Richard Westerdale, Director, Policy Analysis and Public Diplomacy, Bureau of Energy Resources, U.S. Department of State Americo Tadeu, Deputy Director, Advocacy Center, U.S. Department of Commerce Robert Michael, Managing Member, Robert E. Michael & Associates PLLC, Chair, Committee on MENA, New York City Bar Association Aaron Salzberg, Special Coordinator for Water Resources, Office of Conservation and Water, Bureau of Oceans & International Environmental & Scientific Affairs, U.S. Department of State Stuart Beck, United Nations Ambassador for Oceans and Seas, Republic of Palau

Mohamed Elkhashab, CEO & President, Reach Media
11:20AM - 12:20PM
Lincoln Hall

The Role That Media Plays in Shaping US-Arab Perceptions & Business Relations In light of the significance of the media in both the Arab world and the United States, the purpose of this keynote panel is to describe and to examine the role of global media in shaping US-Arab perceptions and business relations. The panel discussion will explore similarities and differences in the role and effects of the media under seemingly very diverse circumstances. The working theory holds that media the world over share many common characteristics. Among them are the necessities to deal with ownership, to adapt to rapidly changing technology and methods, to contend with the proliferation of means, to operate in diverse environments, and to deal with various challenges to provide credible and reliable news reporting and commentary. A major problem is the issue of bias. The important question is not whether bias exists, but to what degree? And, with what perceived effects? Additionally, with what practical implications? Comparative perspectives from this panel of media experts will attempt to answer these and related questions. Mohamed Elkhashab, (Moderator), CEO & President, Reach Media Amat Al Alim Alsoswa, Managing Director, Executive Bureau, Acceleration of Aid Absorption and Support, Policy Reforms Andrew Scott Cooper, Commentator, Historian, Author, The Oil Kings Fuad M. Sahouri, President & CEO, Sahouri Insurance & Financial Jessica Bruder, Journalist, Author, Burning Book: A Visual History of Burning Man Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, Media Relations Specialist, American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee Dr. Michael Morgan, Founder & President, St. Mark's World; Founder, American Pulse

C3-NCUSAR Global Leadership Award
12:20PM - 1:30PM
Main Dining

Saint Lucia is a small island nation in the midst of the Caribbean archipelago, blessed with a breathtaking natural beauty and a warm, friendly and enterprising people. Those two attributes create a magical allure that underpins the offerings and promise of this island State. With a population of just over 170,000, it also has the highest number of Nobel Prize winners per capita in the World ( Sir W. Arthur Lewis, Economics, 1979 and Hon. Derek Walcott, Literature, 1992) and has carved out a niche as host of some of the most exquisite, international award winning boutique hotels on earth. It has also won the World Travel Awards' World's Leading Honeymoons' Destination nine times. Saint Lucia is already a leading international tourist destination for luxury, romance and nature, with great potential to further leverage natural and cultural resources that enhance its overall product offering and to further develop its physical, social and economic infrastructure. There are thus many winning opportunities for potential investors looking for mutually rewarding partnerships. Saint Lucia therefore welcomes investments and business development opportunities that serve to burnish the image of Brand Saint Lucia, while promoting the best attributes of the island and supporting the country's sustainable development objectives, through overall wealth creation, social equity and environmental sustainability. The island's three targeted sectors for investment are: Tourism (high-end branded hotels/resorts; chic boutique properties; health & wellness facilities; specialty restaurants; art galleries; shopping establishments; eco lodges/environmental/leisure parks; state of the art entertainment establishments; animation centers; elite merchandising; cruise ports/marinas etc) Manufacturing (Agro-processing; dairy production; 'smart technology' manufacturing; high-end furniture; high fashion; pharmaceutical products including use of local biodiversity for developing traditional/herbal medicine; production of household products and light industrial tools & materials; production of packing materials; electronic assembly etc.) Hard and Soft Infrastructure (Ports, bridges roads/highways; Healthcare providers; reputable offshore universities; Research Facilities and specialized international schools; Voice/call centre operations; Business process outsourcing (BPO) and knowledge process outsourcing (KPO) operations; technology and hospitality training institutions; alternative energy producers ).

Ports, Rails and Other Mega Projects - Moderator: Steve Lutes, Executive Director, U.S.-GCC Business Initiative & Director, Middle East Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
1:30PM - 2:30PM
Lincoln Hall

Throughout the Arab world, investments in infrastructure are ongoing. United Arab Emirates and Qatar have benefited from such investments. However, more is needed particularly for the "Arab Spring" economies such as Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine, Sudan and Libya. In fact, according to a World Bank study the Arab region needs to spend $100bn per year on infrastructure. As the region undergoes economic change, it is focusing on logistics as central to growth. True, this development varies greatly both in speed and nature from country to country. For example, in anticipation of the FIFA World Cup in 2022, Qatar plans to invest over USD140 billion over the next five years in transport infrastructure to transform Qatar. Investments in constructing a new airport, roads and a metro system have been planned as part of supporting an anticipated influx of visitors for the World Cup as well as leaving a sustainable legacy for Qatar. In short, change is occurring throughout the region and the need for improved and expanded infrastructure is crucial for continued economic development. Steve Lutes, (Moderator), Executive Director, U.S.-GCC Business Initiative & Director, Middle East Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Talal M. Al Kaissi, Chief of Staff & Advisor to the Commercial Counselor, UAE Embassy's Trade and Commercial Office, UAE Peter Ford, COO, Gulftainer, UAE Rob Quartel, CEO & Chairman, NTEL·X Mark Jaffee, President & CEO, Greater New York Chamber of Commerce Mohammed Barakat, Director, US-Qatar Business Council

Youth, Technology and Entrepreneurship - Moderator: Laura Lombard, President & Executive Director, Middle East and North Africa Consultants Association (MENACA)
1:30PM - 2:30PM
Main Lounge

From a macro perspective, both the Arab world and the United States have large, homogeneous markets. For example, consumers in Los Angeles and Boston buy the same products. The same is true in many countries in the Arab world. In markets like this, companies can build scale quickly. Young entrepreneurs have a significant amount of funding available to them from sources like banks and private equity. Private equity is very active in the Arab world and from a venture capital perspective, the country is very competitive. Yet price competition and "me-too" products are rampant. Intellectual property violations are always present. As an entrepreneur, one must learn how to survive in this type of environment. The good news for those young companies that win in the tough domestic market is that they are likely to emerge as formidable global competitors. This means maintaining a talent pool, educating people in areas like business domain skills and project management and keeping a focus on community. With a population of 400M people, of which 30% under the age of 25 are unemployed, entrepreneurship and the use of technology, is the road to eliminating poverty through employment. Laura Lombard, (Moderator), President & Executive Director, Middle East North Africa Consultants Association (MENACA) Robert Starbuck, CEO, Migrate Business Services Laura Owen, Founder & CEO, Ponscio Rula Shunnar, Palestine Country Representative, Silatech Walid G. Mansour, Managing Partner, Middle East Venture Partners, Beirut, Lebanon Henri Asseily, Partner, Leap Ventures, Beirut, Lebanon David S. Rose, CEO, Gust

Why It Matters to Your Business - Moderator: Ron Bruder, Founder and Chairman, Education For Employment
2:40PM - 3:40PM
Lincoln Hall

Over the past several years, youth unemployment has been identified as one of the top global risks, one that presents a significant threat to the political, economic and social fabric of developed and developing nations alike. Given these challenges, nowhere in the world is the role of education and workforce development as critical as in the Arab world, specifically North Africa, home to the world's highest regional youth unemployment rate and fastest growing youth population. As leaders in the region urgently seek solutions that will create more effective models of education and enhance the school-to-work pipeline, a significant new player has entered into the space: the private sector. A growing pool of companies are adopting a proactive role in workforce development and youth employment. In increasing numbers, they frame their involvement in terms that extend beyond "corporate philanthropy," and argue that there is a real business value, and a broader macroeconomic windfall, that can be generated by improving the employment prospects for Arab youth. Ron Bruder, (Moderator), Founder & Chairman, Education For Employment Lisa Anderson, President, American University in Cairo Fathi AW Hayel Saeed, Managing Director, Natco Holding (HSA Group); Chairman, Yemeni Business Club, Yemen Graham Macmillan, Senior Program Manager, For Financial Inclusion, Citi Foundation Radwen Tekaya, Senior Director, CARE EU Operations, Vistaprint Tunisia Gayle Jennings-O'Byrne, VP, JP Morgan Chase Global Philanthropy - USA Wided Fakraoui, Customer Representative, Vistaprint, Tunisia, Alumna, Education for Employment (EFE)

George Likourezos, Partner, Carter Deluca, Farrell & Schmidt
2:40PM - 3:40PM
Main Lounge

There has been a steady rise in annual patent filing numbers in the GCC countries since the late 1990s, from 57 in 1998 to 2,198 in 2013 – illustrating the fact that companies increasingly see the value of protecting IP in the Arab region. Of the 23,000 applications filed between 1998 and 2013, only 5% were filed by residents but that balance may well be starting to shift. There are two main routes for the protection of tools, processes and inventions via patent in the Arab world. The first involves filing a single GCC application, usually within 12 months, and the second is to pursue the national filing route after 30 months via the international PCT. A single Gulf Cooperation Council (covering Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman and UAE) application filed in parallel to an international PCT application is the most cost-effective but pursuing a national filing route at each of the national patent offices following the international PCT route offers a second chance but is more expensive. Wider IP protections can also be achieved throughout the region, especially in relation to brands. Industrial designs can mostly be protected in the region but the weakest safeguards exist in relation to software and copyright law in Qatar, Iraq and Iran. The region's technology needs are evolving fast and the question companies in the market, or those wishing to enter it, need to ask themselves is whether their IP strategy is fit for purpose. Besides applying for patent and industrial design protection, the panel will also discuss IP issues to consider when negotiating employment and other agreements in the GCC and MENA region, and in connection with importing or exporting products from and to this part of the world. Others are ramping up Arab IP protection – should you? George Likourezos, (Moderator), Partner, Carter, Deluca, Farrell & Schmidt Michael Brew, Partner, Patent Attorney, Carter, Deluca, Farrell & Schmidt Jason Scher, Patent Attorney, Carter, Deluca, Farrell & Schmidt Eric Savage, Shareholder, Littler Mendelson Christine Quigley, Of Counsel, Catalano, Gallardo & Petropoulos

An Untapped Natural Resource - Moderator: Judith Barnett, Founder, The Barnett Group
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Lincoln Hall

In a global economy that values mental power over physical might, the region's new comparative advantage could well be its large, educated work force and, increasingly, its female work force. Future economic growth in the Arab region must rely on human resources rather than on the natural resources as in the past. That said, women remain a huge, untapped resource of human potential throughout the region. Yet gender inequality has had both a negative impact on women and society. It prevents the ability of a country or region to efficiently allocate and use it most valuable resource, that of human capital. For this reason, empowering women and providing opportunities for their full integration into all aspects of society is not just an issue of justice but a vital factor in creating a favorable climate to achieving sustainable growth in terms of both regional progress and continued development. This panel will explore the regional complexities of gender issues, the causes of gender inequality and a possible agenda for change given that gender equality is both an economic and social requirement to achieving sustainable progress and development throughout the region. "To impede women's participation in the political, social, economic, scientific, artistic, and cultural spheres, would be tantamount to impeding social progress and human development" Shirin Ebadi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate 2003 Judith Barnett, (Moderator), Founder, The Barnett Group Haifa Al Kaylani, Founder & Chairman, Arab International Women's Forum, London Hala El Barkouky, Founder & Managing Partner, Allied Business Consultants, Cario, Egypt Mona Aboelnaga Kanaan, Managing Partner, K6 Investments LLC Chéma Gargouri, CEO, Center for Applied Training, Tunisia Rahilla Zafar, Author, Arab Women Rising Karim Babay, Founder, Managing Partner, Chief Investment Officer, Intrinsic Value Investment Partners

4:00PM - 5:00PM
Main Lounge

Today's global economy is one in transition to a knowledge economy focused on the production and management of human skill sets which are not just an asset, but a product to produce economic growth and job creation. Within a modern, knowledge driven economy, it is about transferring good ideas, research results and required skills between universities, research organizations, healthcare systems and the global community to enable innovative new healthcare products and scientific services to be developed for improved patient care. Given today's interconnectivity and globalization settings, knowledge transfer in the health and science sectors, between the US and the Arab world, are critical to both economic growth and social development. The Arab world produces a disproportionately small amount of scientific output and, in numerical terms, forty-one predominantly Muslim countries, which account for about 20 percent of the world's total population, generate less than 5 percent of global science related resources. Moreover, annual expenditures on research and development, as well as the minimal numbers of research scientists and engineers, confirm the disparity between populations and the health and science sectors, confirming the need for knowledge transfer in the health and science sectors between the US and the Arab region. Emilio Williams-Lopez, (Moderator), Executive Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Medicine Dr. David Paushter, M.D., Chairman, Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medicine Michael Brown, Vice President Network Development, University of Chicago Medicine Dr. Mussaad Al-Razouki, CEO, Kleos Healthcare Corporation, Kuwait Dr. Husam H. Balkhy, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director, Minimally Invasive & Robotic Cardiac Surgery, The University of Chicago Medicine David Hoidal, Partner, Medpoint Health Partners Mohammed A. Ayoub, Design Principal, HDR

Millennials, Media and Information: Working With Generation Y to Bridge East and West
5:00PM - 5:30PM
Lincoln Hall

With more than half of the Arab world under the age of 25, East and West face unique challenges in meeting the expectations and aspirations of the Millennial generation. U.S. and Arab businesses have an opportunity to embrace this generation and partner with them to create positive change. Research shows that Millennials in Arab and Western societies have more in common and share more traits and values than prior generations, including the desire to cooperate with the business community. Companies can provide the tools, news and information from a more global perspective that not only meets the needs of Millennials, but may also help bring them closer together in order to help solve world problems.

Key Catalysts for Advancing Women Entrepreneurs
7:00AM - 8:00AM
Seward Room (3rd Floor Mezzanine)

C3 Summit and Ponscio are pleased to partner with +SocialGood to host "Key Catalysts for Advancing Women Entrepreneurs", focusing on the critical factors for fostering entrepreneurial development for women, with special emphasis on the Arab World. Topics will include education, mentoring, networking, financing and empowerment of women. The Arab World has an abundance of resources, most importantly human capital. The region is implementing a wide range of initiatives that are enhancing and encouraging gender equality through competitiveness and sustainable development. In short, diversity and an inclusive culture are values that are central to the economic sustainability. Laura Owen, (Moderator), CEO, Ponscio Katie Blot, President, Blackboard Laura Lombard, President, Executive Director, MENACA Lisa Balter Saacks, VP, Gust Rula Shunnar, Country Manager, Silatech